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Mar 7, 2021 - Sun
Bolton United States
Wind 2 m/s, NW
Pressure 768.82 mmHg
31°F
overcast clouds
Humidity 43%
Clouds 97%
sun03/07 mon03/08 tue03/09 wed03/10 thu03/11
29/13°F
31/27°F
44/30°F
47/39°F
51/49°F
Mar 7, 2021 - Sun
Bolton United States
Wind 2 m/s, NW
Pressure 768.82 mmHg
31°F
overcast clouds
Humidity 43%
Clouds 97%
sun03/07 mon03/08 tue03/09 wed03/10 thu03/11
29/13°F
31/27°F
44/30°F
47/39°F
51/49°F

Adirondack Museum – 2012 Cabin Fever Sunday Schedule

January 29
Big Cats of the Adirondacks
Presentation by Paul Jensen, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Natural Resources, McGill University
Adirondack Museum, 1:30 p.m.
Wildlife biologist Paul Jenson will explore the ecology, conservation, and management of big cats in the Adirondacks. Learn about the current and historical distributions of Canadian lynx, bobcat, and mountain lions in New York State and the Northeast, their current populations, the effect of landscape and climate change, and how these species may fare in the 21st Century.
Free to members and children; $5 for non-members. 
 
February 12
Nature: From Howling Wilderness to Vacation Destination
A lecture by Charles Mitchell Associate Professor, American Studies, Elmira College 
Adirondack Museum, 1:30 p.m.
Drawing on landscape painting, photography, traveler’s accounts, and other sources, this presentation explores the evolution of American attitudes towards nature.  Beginning with perceptions of the American landscape as a howling wilderness, a wasteland to be tamed and transformed, the lecture traces the social, cultural and economic forces that led to the perception of wild nature as something of value to be experienced and preserved. Key topics include the sublime, romanticism, Henry David Thoreau, Thomas Cole and the Hudson River School, John Muir, Ansel Adams, and the Lorax. 
This event is free and open to the public. 

 

February 26
Soulful Landscape Concert
With Erica Wheeler
Saranac Village at Will Rogers, 2:00 p.m.
Erica Wheeler believes that we all have stories of place and belonging waiting to be remembered and revealed. She taps into why places matter to us, and shifts the way people relate to the land, each other, and themselves. Inspiring and thought-provoking, the concert uses song, story and humor to take the audience on a transformational journey
Free to members and children; $5 for non-members. 
 
March 11
Adirondack Civilian Conservation Corps: History, Memories, and Legacy of the CCC
With author Marty Podskoch
Tannery Pond Community Center, North Creek, N.Y. 1:30 p.m.
The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a public works program that operated from 1933 to 1942 as part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. In the Adirondacks, enrollees built trails, roads, campsites and dams, they stocked fish, built and maintained fire towers, observers’ cabins and telephone lines, fought fires, and planted millions of trees. Learn about camp life and Adirondack projects with author Marty Podskock.
Free to members and children; $5 for non-members. 
 
March 18
Inventing Fashion: Iroquois Beadwork and the “Art of Flowering”
A lecture by Deborah Holler Lecturer, Empire State College 
Adirondack Museum, 1:30 p.m.
In the mid-19th century, New York State officials began to collect Iroquois material culture, intending to preserve remnants of what they saw as a vanishing race. At the same time, Iroquois women were discovering that their beadwork was appealing to the fashionable Victorian women flocking to Niagara Falls and Saratoga Springs on the Grand Tour of America.  This multimedia presentation traces the historic development of Iroquois beadwork and costume, which came to define the public image of “Indian-ness” around the world. Images are drawn from the collections of the Lewis Henry Morgan and Rochester museums, as well as private collections. These images illuminate the contributions of the Iroquois to the textile arts, as well as the complex cultural exchange that defined the fashions of 19th century New York State. 
This event is free and open to the public. 
 
April 15
Tracking Robert Garrow
With Lawrence Gooley
Adirondack Museum, 1:30 p.m.
In 1974, Adirondack serial killer Robert F. Garrow admitted to four murders and seven rapes. Investigators who worked on his case believed that those admissions may have been just the tip of the iceberg. Learn about Robert F. Garrow’s story from birth to grave. Not a pretty part of Adirondack history, but a part of it nonetheless.
This program has graphic content and is suitable for adult audiences.
Free to members and children; $5 for non-members. 
 
April 22
Children & Nature: The ABC’s of Observation
Presented by Paul Hai
Crandall Public Library, Community Room, Glens Falls, N.Y., 1:30 p.m.
Presentation will be followed by outdoor activities at Crandall Park.
A special program for families to celebrate Earth Day 2012. The ABCs of Observation is an interactive presentation engaging individuals of all ages in rediscovering their skills as keen observers of the natural world. 
Presenter Paul Hai is co-founder of Children in Nature, New York and serves on the Grassroots Leadership Team of the Children & Nature Network. He is passionate about creating interdisciplinary programs using natural history, inquiry-based activities and outdoor experiences as the foundations for teaching the process of science, exploring the Adirondack experience, and for getting children outside. This commitment to using informal science education as a vehicle for reconnecting children to nature will form one of the key programmatic themes of NFI’s new Adirondack Interpretive Center. 
Free to members and children; $5 for non-members.