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Mar 3, 2021 - Wed
Bolton United States
Wind 3 m/s, S
Pressure 758.31 mmHg
28°F
overcast clouds
Humidity 58%
Clouds 90%
wed03/03 thu03/04 fri03/05 sat03/06 sun03/07
37/25°F
26/14°F
23/18°F
22/14°F
28/16°F
Mar 3, 2021 - Wed
Bolton United States
Wind 3 m/s, S
Pressure 758.31 mmHg
28°F
overcast clouds
Humidity 58%
Clouds 90%
wed03/03 thu03/04 fri03/05 sat03/06 sun03/07
37/25°F
26/14°F
23/18°F
22/14°F
28/16°F

ADK Warns Hikers of Spreading Invasives

The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) urges hikers to give their boots a good brushing after each hike to remove any seeds of invasive plant species and help prevent their spread to other wild areas.

“Because of the rapid spread of invasive species such as garlic mustard, Japanese knotweed and wild parsnip, hikers should include a whisk broom or brush as part of their hiking gear,” said Neil Woodworth, executive director of the Adirondack Mountain Club. “By giving your boots or shoes a good brushing before leaving the area, you can help prevent seeds from spreading to the next trail you hike.”

Hikers should also clean their clothing, backpacks and equipment before going to a new area to hike. Campers should shake out their tents before breaking camp to dislodge invasive seeds.

Invasive plants tend to push out native species and disrupt natural habitats, and some pose serious health threats for humans.

Wild parsnip, which looks like Queen Anne’s lace with yellow flowers, is one example of a toxic invasive species. Contact with its sap can cause rashes and blistering. In some cases, it causes long-term sensitivity to sunlight, which manifests itself in a sunburn-like rash.

“Wild parsnip has been called poison ivy on steroids,” Woodworth said. “Anyone who spends time outdoors should know how to identify giant hogweed and wild parsnip and avoid contact with them.’’

Plant species are not the only concern. The emerald ash borer, a tiny beetle that has killed millions of ash trees in the Midwest and in Canada, is threatening New York State. To help prevent the spread of this and other forest-destroying insects, DEC has prohibited the transport of untreated firewood more than 50 miles from its source.

“The precautions needed to prevent the spread of invasive species are a bit of a nuisance, but it’s worth the extra effort to protect our forests and wild areas and our own health,” Woodworth said.